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On drugs perhaps, kidnapped no – Hawaii remains a safe tourism destination

robert allennn
robert allennn
Written by editor

HAWAII (eTN) – This story was widely publicized in the local, national, and international media.

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HAWAII (eTN) – This story was widely publicized in the local, national, and international media. A Sony Open golf player was allegedly kidnapped and beaten in Honolulu after enjoying a nice glass of wine in a respectable tourist bar.

ETN had published this story on January 18, 2015.

More than a week has passed since then, and this story keeps getting more bizarre as the days go by. Hawaii tourism officials are worried about how this incident will reflect on the Aloha State’s tourism image.

In the initial article published by eTN, celebrity golf player, Robert Allen, chose to have a drink in an unusual neighborhood away from all the tourist fun in Waikiki at a bar named Amuse. The Gold Channel reported that he ran up a US$3,400 bar tab at a local strip bar, Femme Nu, a mile away from Amuse.

He was found with bruises on his face outside the Amuse bar at around 1:30 am.

Even though Allen is sticking to his story that he was drugged, kidnapped, and robbed, and then thrown into a car trunk and dumped 6.5 miles away at a park, the information, circumstances, and witness accounts do not add up.

Allen refused to disclose what drugs he took, and he would not share the results of a drug test after the incident.

Consuming drugs with excessive alcohol, and running up thousands of dollars at a strip bar can get you in trouble, even in paradise.

A homeless man, Chris Khamis, told the Honolulu Star-Advertiser last week that Allenby injured himself by passing out and hitting his head on a rock outside the bar. According to Khamis, the Australian golfer spoke with him and said that he was depressed and had been drugged at a strip club where he went to get “some action.”

Hawaii is one of the safest places in the United States when it comes to violent crimes, and insiders are saying that arguments with people that may deal drugs or with pimps can get anyone in trouble – anywhere.

Reviewing the facts, any reasonable person would come to the conclusion that there is more to this story. Allenby pulled himself out of the golf tournament, and there is speculation that what he had recounted initially was an attempt to save him from being kicked out of the golf tourney.

The truth may never be known, but the travel and tourism industry of Hawaii should probably not be too worried about this unfortunate incident that occurred outside the usual tourist destinations.

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About the author

editor

Editor in chief is Linda Hohnholz.