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New rules for evidence in UAE abuse cases

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uaelaws
Written by Nell Alcantara

ABU DHABI: Police officials and investigators across the country will now follow a unified set of guidelines when collecting and processing evidence in cases of abuse, the UAE Ministry of Interior ann

ABU DHABI: Police officials and investigators across the country will now follow a unified set of guidelines when collecting and processing evidence in cases of abuse, the UAE Ministry of Interior announced in a statement on Saturday.

The standards will apply in cases of abuse that pertain to women, children, the elderly and people with special needs, and will help ensure that independent reasoning methods do not hamper the course of the investigation and the gathering of forensic evidence. In addition, the regulations aim to prevent psychological trauma to victims of abuse.
The procedures were announced by Brigadier Nehkairah Al Mahrami, head of human rights at the ministry, at a workshop for police officials.

The official said the ministry hoped to make the regulations, which are outlined in a newly released guidebook, a clear source of reference.
The guidebook requires police officers to take into account human, constitutional and legal values while carrying out their duties.

The workshop was attended by representatives from other law enforcement entities including the Federal Community Police Department, the ministry’s Child Protection Centre and the Higher Committee for Child Protection.

The UAE’s various police departments have made strides in forensic medicine, especially through their use of the latest scientific technologies.

A prominent American publication, the Journal of Forensic Sciences, published a study earlier this year by Abu Dhabi Police researchers who devised a method to best determine the age of death among UAE children using victims’ teeth samples. The department has also discussed cooperation with a United States-based institute run by Henry Lee, one of the world’s foremost criminal experts.
Dubai Police’s Forensic Medicine Department processes nearly 3,200 bodies each year, and has been pushing for Emirati talent within its laboratories.

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