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New Contract for a Muslim Wedding and Divorce

The actual Muslim wedding is known as a nikah. It is a simple ceremony, at which the bride does not have to be present so long as she sends two witnesses to the drawn-up agreement. Normally, the ceremony consists of reading from the Qur’an, and the exchange of vows in front of witnesses for both partners.

In Islamic law (sharia), marriage (nikāḥ نکاح) is a legal and social contract between two individuals. Marriage is an act of Islam and is strongly recommended. Polygyny is permitted in Islam under some conditions, but polyandry is forbidden.

Most Muslims believe marriage is a fundamental building block of life. Marriage is a contract between a man and woman to live together as husband and wife. The marriage contract is called a nikah. keep faithful to each other for the rest of their lives.

In the Qur’an, Muslim men are allowed up to four wives, as long as they can treat each one equally. This is known as polygamy. However, if they cannot treat them equally, Muslim men are advised to have just one wife, and this is the practice in most modern Islamic societies. Muslim women are only allowed one husband.

After a declaration of divorce, Islam requires a three-month waiting period (called the iddah) before the divorce is finalized. During this time, the couple continues to live under the same roof​ but sleeps apart. This gives the couple time to calm down, evaluate the relationship, and perhaps reconcile.

The Arab Translator Association just released a bilingual contract of marriage and divorce contracts in its marriage and divorce glossary.

How many types of marriage are in Islam?

Some purposes include; companionship, reproduction, stability, security, joint economic resources, physical assistance in labor, and “love.” Marriages are of two types; monogamous and polygamous.

Generally, Muslims are told not to meet their spouse before marriage and are condemned from questioning this mentality. In truth, Islam teaches us love is kind, nourishing, and pure. Meeting a spouse before marriage is wholly permitted and allowed if done with the right intentions and appropriately.

Islam encourages individuals to marry young so that they won’t fall prey to the temptation of fornication before marriage. It is perfectly acceptable for young Muslims to start dating around the age of puberty if they feel they are ready for all of the rules and potential responsibilities that come along with it.

Although it is not encouraged, most Muslims agree that divorce is permitted if a marriage has broken down, and generally Muslims are permitted to re-marry if they so wish. However, there are differences between Muslims regarding the procedures for divorce and remarriage: Sunni Muslims do not require witnesses.

What does Allah say about divorce?

[2:226 – 227] Those who intend to divorce their wives shall wait four months (cooling off); if they change their minds and reconcile, then God is Forgiver, Merciful. If they go through with the divorce, then God is Hearer, Knower.

mutʿah, (Arabic: “pleasure”) in Islamic law, is a temporary marriage that is contracted for a limited or fixed period and involves the payment of money to the female partner. Mutʿah is referred to in the Qurʾān (Muslim scriptures) in these words: Shiʿi marriage.


Destination Weddings are also big business for Islamic Couples.

From the United States to the Middle East to South Asia, Islam stretches across a diverse terrain of politics and culture with followers and practices as varied as the countries from which they hail. Marriage in Islam is viewed as a religious obligation, a contract between the couple and Allah. Whether one is planning a Muslim wedding or attending your first Muslim wedding, it’s important to understand historic and cultural Muslim wedding traditions. Learning about these traditions can help you decide what to incorporate into your wedding or guide you on what to expect when you attend a Muslim wedding.

Practices

The only requirement for Muslim weddings is the signing of a marriage contract. Marriage traditions differ depending on culture, an Islamic sect, and observance of gender separation rules. Most marriages are not held in mosques, and men and women remain separate during the ceremony and reception. Since Islam sanctions no official clergy, any Muslim who understands Islamic tradition can officiate a wedding. If you are having your wedding in a mosque, many have marriage officers, called qazi or Madhu, who can oversee the marriage.

If a Muslim wedding ceremony does take place in a Mosque, guests will be expected to remove their shoes before they enter the Mosque.

Meher

The marriage contract includes a meher—a formal statement specifying the monetary amount the groom will give the bride. There are two parts to the Meher: a prompt due before the marriage is consummated and a deferred amount given to the bride throughout her life. Today, many couples use the ring as the prompt because the groom presents it during the ceremony. The deferred amount can be a small sum—a formality—or an actual gift of money, land, jewelry, or even education. The gift belongs to the bride to use as she pleases unless the marriage breaks up before consummation. The Meher is considered the bride’s security and guarantee of freedom within the marriage.

Nikah

The marriage contract is signed in a nikah ceremony, in which the groom or his representative proposes to the bride in front of at least two witnesses, stating the details of the Meher. The bride and groom demonstrate their free will by repeating the word qabul (“I accept,” in Arabic) three times. Then the couple and two male witnesses sign the contract, making the marriage legal according to civil and religious law. Following traditional Islamic customs, the bride and groom may share a piece of sweet fruit, such as a date. If men and women are separated for the ceremony, a male representative called a wali acts on the bride’s behalf during the nikah.

Vows and Blessings

The officiant may add an additional religious ceremony following the nikah, which usually includes a recitation of the Fatihah—the first chapter of the Quran—and durud (blessings). Most Muslim couples do not recite vows; rather, they listen as their officiant speaks about the meaning of marriage and their responsibilities to each other and Allah. However, some Muslim brides and grooms do say vows, such as this common recitation:
Bride: “I, (bride’s name) offer you myself in marriage in accordance with the instructions of the Holy Quran and the Holy Prophet, peace and blessing be upon him. I pledge, in honesty and with sincerity, to be for you an obedient and faithful wife.”
Groom: “I pledge, in honesty and sincerity, to be for you a faithful and helpful husband.”

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About the author

Juergen T Steinmetz

Juergen Thomas Steinmetz has continuously worked in the travel and tourism industry since he was a teenager in Germany (1977).
He founded eTurboNews in 1999 as the first online newsletter for the global travel tourism industry.

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