FAA Orders Abrupt Inspection of All Boeing 737 Jets

FAA Orders New Abrupt Inspection of Boeing 737 Jets
FAA Orders New Abrupt Inspection of Boeing 737 Jets
Written by Harry Johnson

Approximately 2,600 Boeing 737 Max and Next Generation models are impacted by the new FAA emergency directive.

The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced that it has issued an Airworthiness Directive requiring immediate inspection of more than 2,500 Boeing 737 jets, after Boeing discovered that some of the emergency oxygen generators could potentially malfunction as a result of an issue with the retention straps.

In case of emergency, should the aircraft cabin suffer from depressurization, oxygen masks would normally descend from the overhead compartments. Any potential problem with oxygen generators would severely jeopardize the safety of the plane’s passengers.

Approximately 2,600 Boeing 737 Max and Next Generation models are impacted by the new FAA emergency directive. Carriers are required to complete inspections and implement any necessary “corrective actions” within a timeframe of 120 to 150 days, and are strictly prohibited from utilizing parts that may be faulty.

Boeing issued a communication its air carrier customers in mid-June regarding a possible issue with the emergency oxygen supply. US plane maker stated that, in specific situations, the restraining straps on the generators may move up to 1.9 centimeters, causing them to malfunction. Boeing attributed this problem to a defective adhesive that was used in production in 2019.

According to Boeing’s statement, the company had reverted to using the initial adhesive for all upcoming shipments to guarantee the secure placement of the generators. Boeing also mentioned that examinations of all aircraft that have not yet been delivered did not reveal any planes impacted by the defect.

While Boeing’s directive requires just visual checks, the FAA directive is legally binding. Air carriers must inspect all generators in their fleets and install new straps in place if any faulty straps. A standard Boeing 737 jet has 61 oxygen generators, each with two straps, although configurations may vary by airline.

New FAA announcement comes almost immediately after Boeing being penalized $243.6 million for failing to adhere to the conditions of its 2021 agreement with the US government. According to that latest agreement, Boeing has committed to allocating a minimum of $455 million towards enhancing its safety and compliance initiatives within the upcoming three years.

Additionally, the plane maker will be subjected to a three-year probation period overseen by a government-appointed special monitor.

About the author

Harry Johnson

Harry Johnson has been the assignment editor for eTurboNews for mroe than 20 years. He lives in Honolulu, Hawaii, and is originally from Europe. He enjoys writing and covering the news.

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