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Today in U.S. Civil Liberties – 2,000 and counting

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CIVL
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Free Speech, CIA and FBI Abuses of Americans’ Rights, Racial Justice, Freedom of the Press, Women’s Equality, Lesbian and Gay Rights – these are some of the 2,000 entries from over 1,000 subject topic

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Free Speech, CIA and FBI Abuses of Americans’ Rights, Racial Justice, Freedom of the Press, Women’s Equality, Lesbian and Gay Rights – these are some of the 2,000 entries from over 1,000 subject topics included in the “Today in Civil Liberties History” calendar.

What is unique about this calendar is that each event also includes links to learning resources: books, reports, web sites, issue timelines, YouTube videos, and more. Each event, moreover, is cross linked with the people and organizations associated with the event.

Today in Civil Liberties contains the all the major civil liberties history events, and some fascinating lesser known ones as well:

April 16, 1929, the night Margaret Sanger, banned from speaking in Boston, appeared on stage with a gag over her mouth
August 30, 1918, the day the Justice Department raided the offices of the Civil Liberties Bureau and seized all of its records
June 18, 1941, the day civil rights leader A. Philip Randolph confronted President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the White House and forced him to issue an executive order on equal employment opportunity
Check out Sam’s video about Today in Civil Liberties History here: http://youtu.be/xjcnID2mrxg

Wednesday, September 17, also marks the 227th anniversary of the signing of our nation’s constitution. It is the day tens of millions of students all over the United States discuss how this document has changed the course of history worldwide and what the Constitution means to them.

Today in Civil Liberties History was conceived and produced by Prof. Sam Walker, Professor Emeritus at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Professor Walker has dedicated 50 years of his life to civil liberties and civil rights. In the summer of 1964 he was a volunteer in Freedom Summer, the effort to register African-American voters. In 2013 he was an expert witness in the New York City “stop and frisk” trial. He is the author of 14 books on civil liberties, police accountability, and crime policy.

“I hope that Today in Civil Liberties History will bring alive the history of American liberties to Americans who care about our rights,” said Professor Walker. On September 17, 2014 we hope to make educators, students, and the general public aware of this new resource.

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About the author

editor

Editor in chief is Linda Hohnholz.