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Malaysia Airlines deeply regrets

MH370
MH370
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Disbelief among China families of #MH370 passengers. Woman screamed, “how can they lose contact at 2am and still see the flight at 8am?”

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Disbelief among China families of #MH370 passengers. Woman screamed, “how can they lose contact at 2am and still see the flight at 8am?”

The official Chinese news agency, Xinhua, has confirmed that at least one of the grieving relatives in Beijing was carried out of the Lido hotel on a stretcher.
This was after Malaysian Airlines released the following statement concluding the flight crashed on their website:

The communication below was shared with the family members of passengers and crew of MH370

Malaysia Airlines deeply regrets that we have to assume that MH370 ended in the southern Indian Ocean. As you will hear in the next hour from Malaysia’s Prime Minister, new analysis of satellite data suggests the plane went down in the Southern Indian Ocean.

On behalf of all of us at Malaysia Airlines and all Malaysians, our prayers go out to all the loved ones of the 226 passengers and of our 13 friends and colleagues at this enormously painful time.

We know there are no words that we or anyone else can say which can ease your pain. We will continue to provide assistance and support to you, as we have done since MH370 first disappeared in the early hours of 8 March, while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.

The ongoing multinational search operation will continue, as we seek answers to the questions which remain. Alongside the search for MH370, there is an intensive investigation, which we hope will also provide answers.

We would like to assure you that Malaysia Airlines will continue to give you our full support throughout the difficult weeks and months ahead.

Once again, we humbly offer our sincere thoughts, prayers and condolences to everyone affected by this tragedy.

Once again, we humbly offer our sincere thoughts, prayers and condolences to everyone affected by this tragedy.

CNN reported: Military radar tracking shows that the aircraft changed altitude after making a sharp turn over the South China Sea as it headed toward the Strait of Malacca, a source close to the investigation into the missing flight told CNN. The plane flew as low as 12,000 feet at some point before it disappeared from radar, according to the source.
The sharp turn seemed to be intentional, the source said, because executing it would have taken the Boeing 777 two minutes — a time period during which the pilot or co-pilot could have sent an emergency signal if there had been a fire or other emergency onboard.

The three BEA staff members returned from Kuala Lumpur this week-end.

During their week’s work alongside their American and British counterparts, they were able to share with Malaysian authorities their experience in the organization of undersea searches, acquired during the search between 2009 and 2011 for the wreckage of Rio-Paris flight AF447. They were thus able to advise their interlocutors on the means to be put in place if undersea searches need to be launched in order to find the Boeing 777.

It should be noted that the information available today has led to surface sea searches being carried out in order to identify debris observed in the southern Indian Ocean. Such a vast area does not, at present, make it feasible to conduct undersea searches. An undersea phase to localize the aeroplane from flight MH 370 could only be launched if the operations under way today enable a more limited search area to be defined than the current search areas.

The BEA reminds you that only the Malaysian authorities may communicate information on the progress of the investigation.

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About the author

editor

Editor in chief is Linda Hohnholz.