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The traditional gentleman is alive and well in UK

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LONDON, England – New research, conducted in a bid to uncover what makes a modern British gentleman (garnered from over 2,000 UK adults), provides interesting insights into the modern British man and

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LONDON, England – New research, conducted in a bid to uncover what makes a modern British gentleman (garnered from over 2,000 UK adults), provides interesting insights into the modern British man and proves that men are still proud to embody traditionally held views of masculinity. A real man pays the bill on a first date (52%), and despite fashion and celebrity trends, less than two out of 10 men thought a modern man should wear speedos or a sarong (18% and 15% respectively). It’s an opinion supported by women, who would rather their partner knows how to change a tyre than knowing the season’s key fashion trends (44% versus a measly 5%).

When it comes to relationships, it seems that men rated being great in bed (41%) as the most appealing characteristic for an ideal partner, as compared to being a good housewife. In fact, being good in the bedroom was considered significantly more important than homely qualities such as being a fantastic cook (21%) or a DIY whizz around the house (4%). Whilst 41% of British men consider their partner’s bedroom performance to be paramount, 40% of women rated a man’s skills at manual activities (cooking or DIY) as more important than their in-bed prowess (19%).

The research also revealed other interesting insights, some of which should make men sit up and pay attention. 24% of women still expect men to make the first move, even though 72% of men don’t think it matters either way. So, ladies don’t be afraid to initiate contact. And Welsh women: don’t forget your wallet – less than a third believed that the man should pay on a first date, while the Scots had the most traditional view of a first date with six out of 10 respondents saying the man should cover the cost.

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editor

Editor in chief is Linda Hohnholz.