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Tahiti’s rare tourist attraction–transit of Venus

Whether you are an astronomer or not, the chance to see a rare astronomical phenomenon is something that piques interest. For some, this is enough incentive to travel.

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Whether you are an astronomer or not, the chance to see a rare astronomical phenomenon is something that piques interest. For some, this is enough incentive to travel. If you are that type of travelers, then it’s not too late to book a trip to Tahiti!

On June 5, 2012 a very rare and beautiful astronomical event will take place in the skies above the islands of Tahiti. Venus will cross in front of the sun, an occurrence only happens twice every 100 years! The next “transit of Venus” will not happen until 2117.

This event has special meaning in the islands of Tahiti, as Captain James Cook, the famous British navigator, was in the islands during his first voyage in the South Pacific in 1769 and witnessed the event – and this was the last time it was seen in Tahiti!

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