Another safety blow for Boeing: 737 MAX and NG’s “improperly manufactured parts” need replacement

Afrikaans Afrikaans Albanian Albanian Amharic Amharic Arabic Arabic Armenian Armenian Azerbaijani Azerbaijani Basque Basque Belarusian Belarusian Bengali Bengali Bosnian Bosnian Bulgarian Bulgarian Cebuano Cebuano Chichewa Chichewa Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Simplified) Corsican Corsican Croatian Croatian Czech Czech Dutch Dutch English English Esperanto Esperanto Estonian Estonian Filipino Filipino Finnish Finnish French French Frisian Frisian Galician Galician Georgian Georgian German German Greek Greek Gujarati Gujarati Haitian Creole Haitian Creole Hausa Hausa Hawaiian Hawaiian Hebrew Hebrew Hindi Hindi Hmong Hmong Hungarian Hungarian Icelandic Icelandic Igbo Igbo Indonesian Indonesian Italian Italian Japanese Japanese Javanese Javanese Kannada Kannada Kazakh Kazakh Khmer Khmer Korean Korean Kurdish (Kurmanji) Kurdish (Kurmanji) Kyrgyz Kyrgyz Lao Lao Latin Latin Latvian Latvian Lithuanian Lithuanian Luxembourgish Luxembourgish Macedonian Macedonian Malagasy Malagasy Malay Malay Malayalam Malayalam Maltese Maltese Maori Maori Marathi Marathi Mongolian Mongolian Myanmar (Burmese) Myanmar (Burmese) Nepali Nepali Norwegian Norwegian Pashto Pashto Persian Persian Polish Polish Portuguese Portuguese Punjabi Punjabi Romanian Romanian Russian Russian Samoan Samoan Scottish Gaelic Scottish Gaelic Serbian Serbian Sesotho Sesotho Shona Shona Sindhi Sindhi Sinhala Sinhala Slovak Slovak Slovenian Slovenian Somali Somali Spanish Spanish Sudanese Sudanese Swahili Swahili Swedish Swedish Tajik Tajik Tamil Tamil Thai Thai Turkish Turkish Ukrainian Ukrainian Urdu Urdu Uzbek Uzbek Vietnamese Vietnamese Xhosa Xhosa Yiddish Yiddish Zulu Zulu
0a1a-13

Boeing 737 MAX and NG manufacturer revealed that some aircraft parts were improperly manufactured and would need replacement dealing yet another safety issue blow to troubled aircraft.

Up to 148 leading edge slat tracks – aerodynamic surfaces on a plane’s wings, which allow it to operate at a higher angle of attack – had defects, the company told the US Federal Aviation Administration. All the faulty parts were produced by a Boeing sub-tier supplier and could affect up to 133 NG and 179 MAX planes worldwide.

Although complete failure of a slat track is unlikely to cause a plane crash directly, it could still lead to aircraft damage in flight, the FAA said in a statement. The faulty parts could be potentially susceptible to premature wear-out or cracks.

The FAA also said it would soon issue an airworthiness directive to mandate Boeing service actions worldwide.

The news comes as the US aircraft manufacturer is still reeling from another scandal involving its 737 MAX models. All planes of this model were earlier grounded worldwide following two deadly crashes that were blamed on the aircraft’s malfunctioning flight control system.

In late May, the company admitted that it “fell short” and failed to install a safety feature that could have prevented both catastrophes, which killed 346 people in total. So far, the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft remain grounded as the company has yet to present a software upgrade to the FAA.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email