Why travel to Alaska in the Winter?

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AKWinter

The U.S. State of Alaska is known to be a popular summer destination. It’s widely known Alaska is very cold and dark in the winter, but nowadays this doesn’t stop visitors to plan on adding Alaska to their travel plans.

The Anchorage Daily News reports visitor volume grew 33 percent for the fall and winter season over the past 10 years.

Winter business has been up for the Alaska Railroad in the past few years. Passengers on Alaska’s trains grew 33 percent between the winter of 2015-2016 and the following year.

The railroad has added more train service to accommodate the larger number of demand. Visitors from Asia are booking trains more and more.

Alaska’s tourism officials promote winter travel to the State in saying: Winter in Alaska is a special time full of festivals, performances, and endless outdoor opportunity. As soon as the first snowflakes fall, Alaskans start chomping at the bit to get outside and play!

Contrary to popular belief, Alaska is not confined by the cold or shorter days. Winter brings festivals, ski races, dog sledding toursnorthern lights viewingNordic skiingdownhill skiing, winter biking, snowshoeing, snowmobiling, gorgeous scenery, ice skating, bonfires, ice fishing, dining, and shopping.

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Alaska.org wants longer nights to turn into a tourist attraction and promotes “Ski by moonlight”