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Caribbean Airlines orders 12 Boeing 737 MAX 8 jets

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Boeing and Caribbean Airlines today announced the airline has chosen to enhance and renew its single-aisle fleet with the 737 MAX 8. The carrier, which has long operated the Next-Generation 737, will take delivery of 12 MAX airplanes in the coming years.

The airline commemorated the selection of the MAX during a ceremony featuring national dignitaries, including the Prime Minister of Trinidad and Tobago, the Honorable Keith Rowley, and Caribbean Airlines Chief Executive Officer, Garvin Medera.

“Boeing has been by our side since Caribbean Airlines was founded twelve years ago using the 737-800. The 737 MAX allows us to continue offering a safe and comfortable experience for our passengers, while significantly improving fuel efficiency and environmental performance,” said Medera. “All of these elements position us for long-term success.”

The 737 MAX 8 โ€“ part of a fuel-efficient family of airplanes โ€“ will seat up to 160 passengers in Caribbean Airlines’ three-class configuration featuring the “Caribbean Plus” Cabin, and provide more than 500 nautical miles more range than the existing aircraft.

The airplane incorporates the latest technology CFM International LEAP-1B engines, Advanced Technology winglets, and other airframe enhancements to improve performance and reduce operating costs. Caribbean Airlines projects the MAX 8 will provide up to 16 percent fuel savings compared to its current fleet.

The MAX, outfitted with the popular Boeing Sky Interior and designed to be quieter than previous jets, will also offer Caribbean’s customers the latest in passenger comforts.

“We are honored that Caribbean Airlines has placed its trust once again in the Boeing airplane family and chosen to bridge to the future with the 737 MAX 8. Its selection reaffirms the partnership we have built together with the Next-Generation 737 family,” said Ihssane Mounir, senior vice president of Commercial Sales & Marketing for The Boeing Company.

In addition to flying Boeing airplanes, Caribbean Airlines also uses Boeing’s services to optimize its operations. The carrier participates in the Fuel Dashboard Program, for example, which allows operators to look across their fleet and identify fuel savings. Caribbean also uses Boeing’s consumable and expendable material services to ensure it has the parts it needs when it needs it.