Volcano explodes in Italy

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A stronger-than-usual explosion was captured on cameras operated by the Istituto Nazionale Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV). Imagery shared by Il Mondo dei Terremoti on Twitter shows the eruption in real-time; video captured by infrared cameras that shows the ultra-hot initial eruption and the slightly cooler cloud of ash and gases careening downslope. This avalanche of hot ash and gases is known as pyroclastic flow. 

From the village, a spectacular ash plume rising several 100 m above the summit could be seen. Soon after the eruption, moderately strong ash rain of small lapilli set in, covering all surfaces.

The color of most particles, up to a few mm in size, was mostly brown to reddish brown, described as “earthy”. This could mean that most of the ejected material might be from older lava rocks in the summit craters or inside the vent, from collapsed parts of the craters or conduits. However, a small amount of lighter pumice was also present in the ash, probably representing a batch of fresh magma that had driven the explosion.

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