U.S. Travel on Big Airlines’ Challenges

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WASHINGTON (April 10, 2017)—U.S. Travel Association Executive Vice President for Public Affairs Jonathan Grella issued the following statement:

“For days, the airwaves have been filled with negative stories about airlines. The common denominator here is that air travel has become all too unpleasant for scores of travelers. While airlines tout record profits generated on the backs of their passengers, many are left stranded with few to no options. Years of over-consolidation, compounded by policymaking favoring the airlines rather than the travelers they serve, has led to a broken system that needs to be fixed.

“Airlines that obstruct airport infrastructure improvements and growth or advocate the undoing of our nation’s Open Skies policies should use this moment to consider how to make the system better, not worse, with more choice and connectivity for all.

“It’s time Washington ‘re-accommodate’ the proverbial fox from the henhouse and put passengers and their experiences first in the equation.”

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