Visiting Guam? Get ready to get close

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Of the 1.3 million tourists to visit the island in 2013, Guam Visitors Bureau said half came from Japan, 169,000 from South Korea, 65,000 from the U.S. mainland, and some 39,000 from Taiwan.

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Of the 1.3 million tourists to visit the island in 2013, Guam Visitors Bureau said half came from Japan, 169,000 from South Korea, 65,000 from the U.S. mainland, and some 39,000 from Taiwan. The island is also home to some 12,000 military personnel, and according to The World Factbook, a local population of 160,000 Chamorro, Filipino, Chuukese, Korean, Chinese, Palauan, Japanese, and Pohnpeian peoples.


Though most of us speak English, drink Coca-Cola and get ample amounts of vitamin D, how to get along in a culturally diverse place isn’t always obvious. You’ll learn about island-time soon enough, but many social cues are subtle and easily overlooked.

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