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US hotel industry begins 2009 in the red

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Written by editor

The hotel industry in the United States experienced declines in three key performance measurements during the week of 28 December 2008-03 January 2009, according to data from the Smith Travel Research

The hotel industry in the United States experienced declines in three key performance measurements during the week of 28 December 2008-03 January 2009, according to data from the Smith Travel Research (STR).

According to STR鈥檚 research, revenue per available room fell 3.6 percent from the comparable period a year ago to finish the week at US$44.40 (US$46.05 in 2007-2008). The industry鈥檚 occupancy for the week dropped 0.5 percent to end at 42.9 percent (43.1 percent in 2007-2008), while average room rate declined 3.2 percent to complete the week at US$103.43 (US$106.80 in 2007-2008).

The performances of the chain-scale segments varied:
路 Luxury segment: occupancy +2.5 percent (55.2 percent); average daily room rate (ADR) -10.0 percent (US$322.31); revenue per available room (RevPAR) -7.7 percent (US$178.06).
路 Upper Upscale segment: occupancy -1.4 percent (45.8 percent); ADR -7.1 percent (US$145.88); RevPAR -8.4 percent (US$66.84).
路 Upscale segment: occupancy -3.3 percent (39.2 percent); ADR -7.6 percent (US$104.35); RevPAR -10.6 percent (US$40.86).
路 Midscale with Food and Beverage segment: occupancy -3.1 percent (37.7 percent); ADR -0.3 percent (US$83.42); RevPAR -3.4 percent (US$31.46).
路 Midscale without Food and Beverage segment: occupancy -2.1 percent (38.6 percent); ADR -2.3 percent (US$81.66); RevPAR -4.4 percent (US$31.50).
路 Economy segment: occupancy -1.2 percent (42.0 percent); ADR -0.5 percent (US$52.63); RevPAR -1.7 percent (US$22.09).
路 Independents segment: occupancy +2.4 percent (46.8 percent); ADR -1.5 percent (US$108.61); RevPAR +0.8 percent (US$50.80).

STR found that among top 25 markets, seven achieved RevPAR gains, including San Francisco/San Mateo, California (+12.4 percent); Orlando, Florida (+11.2 percent); and New York, New York (+7.1 percent). Houston, Texas (+6.3 percent) and New York, (+1.2 percent) were the only two top 25 market to report a gain in ADR. Eleven of the top 25 markets experienced gains in occupancy, including San Francisco/San Mateo (+17.5 percent); Orlando (+14.7 percent); and San Diego, California (+11.2 percent).