Read us | Listen to us | Watch us | Join Live Events | Turn Off Ads | Live |

Click on your language to translate this article:

Afrikaans Afrikaans Albanian Albanian Amharic Amharic Arabic Arabic Armenian Armenian Azerbaijani Azerbaijani Basque Basque Belarusian Belarusian Bengali Bengali Bosnian Bosnian Bulgarian Bulgarian Catalan Catalan Cebuano Cebuano Chichewa Chichewa Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional) Chinese (Traditional) Corsican Corsican Croatian Croatian Czech Czech Danish Danish Dutch Dutch English English Esperanto Esperanto Estonian Estonian Filipino Filipino Finnish Finnish French French Frisian Frisian Galician Galician Georgian Georgian German German Greek Greek Gujarati Gujarati Haitian Creole Haitian Creole Hausa Hausa Hawaiian Hawaiian Hebrew Hebrew Hindi Hindi Hmong Hmong Hungarian Hungarian Icelandic Icelandic Igbo Igbo Indonesian Indonesian Irish Irish Italian Italian Japanese Japanese Javanese Javanese Kannada Kannada Kazakh Kazakh Khmer Khmer Korean Korean Kurdish (Kurmanji) Kurdish (Kurmanji) Kyrgyz Kyrgyz Lao Lao Latin Latin Latvian Latvian Lithuanian Lithuanian Luxembourgish Luxembourgish Macedonian Macedonian Malagasy Malagasy Malay Malay Malayalam Malayalam Maltese Maltese Maori Maori Marathi Marathi Mongolian Mongolian Myanmar (Burmese) Myanmar (Burmese) Nepali Nepali Norwegian Norwegian Pashto Pashto Persian Persian Polish Polish Portuguese Portuguese Punjabi Punjabi Romanian Romanian Russian Russian Samoan Samoan Scottish Gaelic Scottish Gaelic Serbian Serbian Sesotho Sesotho Shona Shona Sindhi Sindhi Sinhala Sinhala Slovak Slovak Slovenian Slovenian Somali Somali Spanish Spanish Sudanese Sudanese Swahili Swahili Swedish Swedish Tajik Tajik Tamil Tamil Telugu Telugu Thai Thai Turkish Turkish Ukrainian Ukrainian Urdu Urdu Uzbek Uzbek Vietnamese Vietnamese Welsh Welsh Xhosa Xhosa Yiddish Yiddish Yoruba Yoruba Zulu Zulu

Cracks appear in Chinese glass “skywalk” opened just two weeks ago

0a1_3026
0a1_3026
Written by editor

BEIJING, China – Tourists looking for thrills got more than they bargained for when cracks appeared in a glass-bottomed bridge suspended 3,540 feet over a canyon in China.

BEIJING, China – Tourists looking for thrills got more than they bargained for when cracks appeared in a glass-bottomed bridge suspended 3,540 feet over a canyon in China.

Images showing small cracks in the “skywalk” built around a mountain, which opened just two weeks ago, spread on social media along with doubts over its safety.

“When I was almost at the end (of the walkway), there was a sudden loud bang and a tremor beneath my feet,” the state-run China Net cited one woman as saying on Tuesday.

The cracks resembled “winter frost on a window pane”, the report said, and were apparently caused by a dropped stainless steel cup.

But the incident at Yuntai mountain in the northern province of Henan “doesn’t affect safety”, park officials were quoted as saying.

The glass made up of three layers is supposedly capable of supporting up to 800 kilograms (1,763 pounds) per square metre, they said.

The incident occured during China’s hectic week-long national holiday period, when tens of millions take pleasure trips.