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Boeing delivers first South Carolina-built 787-9 Dreamliner

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NORTH CHARLESTON, SC – Boeing has delivered the first 787-9 Dreamliner assembled at its North Charleston, SC, facility to United Airlines.

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NORTH CHARLESTON, SC – Boeing has delivered the first 787-9 Dreamliner assembled at its North Charleston, SC, facility to United Airlines. The airplane also marks a milestone for the 787 program as the 250th Dreamliner to be delivered.

“In 2012, we delivered our first South Carolina-built 787-8, and less than three years later, we’re celebrating another significant milestone – our first 787-9 delivery,” said Beverly Wyse, vice president and general manager, Boeing South Carolina. “This is an incredible achievement for Boeing, and I’m proud to be a member of the Boeing South Carolina team.”

In the first quarter of 2013, Boeing South Carolina teammates began fabrication, assembly and integration of the aft and mid fuselage sections for the first Boeing 787-9 and delivered them to Everett Final Assembly. In November 2014, work began on the first South Carolina-built 787-9 when the first aft and mid sections were delivered to Boeing South Carolina Final Assembly. The airplane rolled out to the flight line in January 2015 and completed its first flight last month.

“Our customers have told us they love flying on the Dreamliner, and we’re excited to mark yet another first for the aircraft with this delivery from Boeing South Carolina,” said United’s Vice President of Fleet Ron Baur. “We were the first North American carrier to fly the 787-8 in September 2012 and the first to fly 787-9s in September 2014. The Dreamliners have allowed us to fly longer distances with greater fuel efficiency and open new direct routes such as Los Angeles to Melbourne, while providing our customers and employees with a more comfortable flying experience.”

This is the fourth 787-9 for United Airlines, in addition to the 12 787-8s the airline already has in service.

The 787-9 complements and extends the 787 family. With the fuselage stretched by 20 feet (6 meters) over the 787-8, the 787-9 is designed to fly up more passengers and cargo farther with the same exceptional fuel and environmental performance: 20 percent less fuel use and emissions than the airplanes they replace.

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